Mailing List Archive

Which Router
Hi List,

Forgive me if I am asking stupid questions, but I am new to BGP.

We are looking to empower our networks with BGP. We have 3 pops and 3 different providers. Currently we have various staticly routed connections, which is bad for a hosting co.

POP A: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
POP B: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
Corp HQ: 10meg to POP A and 1x 2meg to Telia and 1x 2meg to Telstra

We have a peak at Christmas of around 60mbits/sec across all links.

I am looking at the Juniper J series of routers, as our requirements at the moment are pretty small. Speaking to my hardware vendors has not filled me with confidence and they do not seem to know what i need in terms of the routers. Our switches are all already speaking OSPF etc.

In each location we will have 3 bgp sessions this I know. 2x eBgp and 1x iBgp. Will a J2320 with 1Gb Ram be enough to hold the routing tables required and run? Since we take full transit from all ISPs I am guessing this is going to be ok, but will not allow much growth. My suggestion internally for kit would be the J4350 with 1Gb Ram to start, then upgrading to 2Gb in the future as we perhaps take transits from others or peer publically.

What would anyone reccomend? Are there any guidelines any of you have as to how much ram I would need in the devices? (We are looking at 1 router within each location presently as they are purely borders)


Many Thanks,

Lee
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
Lee Hetherington wrote:
> Hi List,
>
> Forgive me if I am asking stupid questions, but I am new to BGP.
>
> We are looking to empower our networks with BGP. We have 3 pops and 3 different providers. Currently we have various staticly routed connections, which is bad for a hosting co.
>
> POP A: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
> POP B: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
> Corp HQ: 10meg to POP A and 1x 2meg to Telia and 1x 2meg to Telstra
>
> We have a peak at Christmas of around 60mbits/sec across all links.
>
> I am looking at the Juniper J series of routers, as our requirements at the moment are pretty small. Speaking to my hardware vendors has not filled me with confidence and they do not seem to know what i need in terms of the routers. Our switches are all already speaking OSPF etc.
>
> In each location we will have 3 bgp sessions this I know. 2x eBgp and 1x iBgp.
I'm not sure how you are calculating the number of sessions required,
keep in mind that your iBGP peers need to be full meshed unless you are
running route reflection (which is an separate license in the 2350 as is
my understanding).
> Will a J2320 with 1Gb Ram be enough to hold the routing tables required and run? Since we take full transit from all ISPs I am guessing this is going to be ok, but will not allow much growth. My suggestion internally for kit would be the J4350 with 1Gb Ram to start, then upgrading to 2Gb in the future as we perhaps take transits from others or peer publically.
>
>
As for router size, if you are taking only default or customer routes, J
series might be fine. Our sales engineer recommends the J6350 at a
minimum for full routes, and really suggests that we be at the M series
(M7i, M10i for in chassis redundancy).

YMMV, IMHO, etc etc..


--Justin

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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
Justin Sharp wrote:
> Lee Hetherington wrote:
>
>> Hi List,
>>
>> Forgive me if I am asking stupid questions, but I am new to BGP.
>>
>> We are looking to empower our networks with BGP. We have 3 pops and 3 different providers. Currently we have various staticly routed connections, which is bad for a hosting co.
>>
>> POP A: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
>> POP B: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
>> Corp HQ: 10meg to POP A and 1x 2meg to Telia and 1x 2meg to Telstra
>>
>> We have a peak at Christmas of around 60mbits/sec across all links.
>>
>> I am looking at the Juniper J series of routers, as our requirements at the moment are pretty small. Speaking to my hardware vendors has not filled me with confidence and they do not seem to know what i need in terms of the routers. Our switches are all already speaking OSPF etc.
>>
>> In each location we will have 3 bgp sessions this I know. 2x eBgp and 1x iBgp.
>>
> I'm not sure how you are calculating the number of sessions required,
> keep in mind that your iBGP peers need to be full meshed unless you are
> running route reflection (which is an separate license in the 2350 as is
> my understanding).
>
>> Will a J2320 with 1Gb Ram be enough to hold the routing tables required and run? Since we take full transit from all ISPs I am guessing this is going to be ok, but will not allow much growth. My suggestion internally for kit would be the J4350 with 1Gb Ram to start, then upgrading to 2Gb in the future as we perhaps take transits from others or peer publically.
>>
>>
>>
> As for router size, if you are taking only default or customer routes, J
> series might be fine. Our sales engineer recommends the J6350 at a
> minimum for full routes, and really suggests that we be at the M series
> (M7i, M10i for in chassis redundancy).
>
> YMMV, IMHO, etc etc..
>
>
>
Sorry for replying to myself, but wanted to also add.. You will not see
your 1000Mb of throughput on the lower end J's. So you pay for 1000Mb
but you won't ever get it unless you step up the router. Also, the M
series is a whole different ball of wax when it comes to cost :) Now you
get to pay for each and every interface, and in some cases, interfaces
to perform other services (like vpn, mlppp, etc). Lastly, those PICs
aint cheap.. a good deal of them cost more than the router (I think list
price on an 2xOC3 is like 35k, not sure what a gige port costs).
> --Justin
>
> _______________________________________________
> juniper-nsp mailing list juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/juniper-nsp
>
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
We have J4350s taking several full tables each. Traffic peaks at about
100mbps and CPU sits constantly at about 10%. I'm not sure how much
slower the CPU on the J2320 is but I would be surprised if it couldn't
comfortably handle our traffic loads with full tables.


-----Original Message-----
From: juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net
[mailto:juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Justin Sharp
Sent: Wednesday, 14 May 2008 10:24 AM
To: justin@sharpone.net
Cc: juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net
Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router



Justin Sharp wrote:
> Lee Hetherington wrote:
>
>> Hi List,
>>
>> Forgive me if I am asking stupid questions, but I am new to BGP.
>>
>> We are looking to empower our networks with BGP. We have 3 pops and
3 different providers. Currently we have various staticly routed
connections, which is bad for a hosting co.
>>
>> POP A: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
>> POP B: 100Meg to Abovenet and 1000Meg to A smaller uk isp
>> Corp HQ: 10meg to POP A and 1x 2meg to Telia and 1x 2meg to Telstra
>>
>> We have a peak at Christmas of around 60mbits/sec across all links.
>>
>> I am looking at the Juniper J series of routers, as our requirements
at the moment are pretty small. Speaking to my hardware vendors has not
filled me with confidence and they do not seem to know what i need in
terms of the routers. Our switches are all already speaking OSPF etc.
>>
>> In each location we will have 3 bgp sessions this I know. 2x eBgp
and 1x iBgp.
>>
> I'm not sure how you are calculating the number of sessions required,
> keep in mind that your iBGP peers need to be full meshed unless you
are
> running route reflection (which is an separate license in the 2350 as
is
> my understanding).
>
>> Will a J2320 with 1Gb Ram be enough to hold the routing tables
required and run? Since we take full transit from all ISPs I am
guessing this is going to be ok, but will not allow much growth. My
suggestion internally for kit would be the J4350 with 1Gb Ram to start,
then upgrading to 2Gb in the future as we perhaps take transits from
others or peer publically.
>>
>>
>>
> As for router size, if you are taking only default or customer routes,
J
> series might be fine. Our sales engineer recommends the J6350 at a
> minimum for full routes, and really suggests that we be at the M
series
> (M7i, M10i for in chassis redundancy).
>
> YMMV, IMHO, etc etc..
>
>
>
Sorry for replying to myself, but wanted to also add.. You will not see
your 1000Mb of throughput on the lower end J's. So you pay for 1000Mb
but you won't ever get it unless you step up the router. Also, the M
series is a whole different ball of wax when it comes to cost :) Now you

get to pay for each and every interface, and in some cases, interfaces
to perform other services (like vpn, mlppp, etc). Lastly, those PICs
aint cheap.. a good deal of them cost more than the router (I think list

price on an 2xOC3 is like 35k, not sure what a gige port costs).
> --Justin
>
> _______________________________________________
> juniper-nsp mailing list juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/juniper-nsp
>
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
Campbell, Alex wrote:
> We have J4350s taking several full tables each. Traffic peaks at about
> 100mbps and CPU sits constantly at about 10%. I'm not sure how much
> slower the CPU on the J2320 is but I would be surprised if it couldn't
> comfortably handle our traffic loads with full tables.
>
>
I'm pretty much convinced that the J2320 will take full routes without a
problem at 1GB of RAM and it should do more than 100Mbps of traffic at
very low CPU usage.

My assumption is based on the fact that I could take one full view with
512MB of RAM and a 2.53 Intel Celeron with quagga it it would do 100Mbps
at 1-5% CPU usage.
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
Thanks Eugeniu

Think that's going to be the option for now. I can persuade finance to
buy more of them this way ;)

Thanks for your help guys!

Lee

-----Original Message-----
From: juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net
[mailto:juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Eugeniu
Patrascu
Sent: 14 May 2008 09:39
To: Campbell, Alex
Cc: juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net; justin@sharpone.net
Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router

Campbell, Alex wrote:
> We have J4350s taking several full tables each. Traffic peaks at
about
> 100mbps and CPU sits constantly at about 10%. I'm not sure how much
> slower the CPU on the J2320 is but I would be surprised if it couldn't
> comfortably handle our traffic loads with full tables.
>
>
I'm pretty much convinced that the J2320 will take full routes without a

problem at 1GB of RAM and it should do more than 100Mbps of traffic at
very low CPU usage.

My assumption is based on the fact that I could take one full view with
512MB of RAM and a 2.53 Intel Celeron with quagga it it would do 100Mbps

at 1-5% CPU usage.
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
> -----Original Message-----
> From: juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net [mailto:juniper-nsp-
> bounces@puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Lee Hetherington
> Sent: Wednesday, May 14, 2008 5:04 AM
> To: Eugeniu Patrascu; Campbell, Alex
> Cc: juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net; justin@sharpone.net
> Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router
>
> Thanks Eugeniu
>
> Think that's going to be the option for now. I can persuade finance
> to
> buy more of them this way ;)
>
> Thanks for your help guys!
>
> Lee
>

I can attest that a J2350 with 1G of RAM can take two full tables and run +150Mb/s without a problem. If you're looking to save money, don't go with the costly Juniper RAM upgrade kit. I'm not sure if vendors think their memory is lined with platinum, plated in diamond-encrusted gold, and made from the hides of endangered species, but the cost of these RAM upgrades is insane. You can get a 1G memory stick from Crucial that will work for about $60 as opposed to the $2K or more you would spend on the special kit from Juniper.

-evt
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
I think I am the only one having issues with my J2320. I use it as a
peering device and have 91 BGP peers on there. It has 1GB of RAM,
about 492K routes, and it averages 72% CPU utilization. Traffic-wise,
it does about 38Mbps to one peering point and 55Mbps to another. It
is holding up surprisingly well, but to be honest I expected a bit
more. Maybe sometimes I am too demanding, and this was a $2000
device, so I shouldnt complain much :)

> show bgp summary
Groups: 7 Peers: 91 Down peers: 5
Table Tot Paths Act Paths Suppressed History Damp State Pending
inet.0 492306 253719 0 0 0 0

> show chassis routing-engine
Routing Engine status:
DRAM 1024 MB
Memory utilization 75 percent
CPU utilization:
User 8 percent
Real-time threads 20 percent
Kernel 72 percent
Idle 0 percent

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than here? What better time than now?
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
On Wed, May 14, 2008 at 09:06:27AM -0400, Jose Madrid wrote:
> I think I am the only one having issues with my J2320. I use it as a
> peering device and have 91 BGP peers on there. It has 1GB of RAM,
> about 492K routes, and it averages 72% CPU utilization. Traffic-wise,
> it does about 38Mbps to one peering point and 55Mbps to another. It
> is holding up surprisingly well, but to be honest I expected a bit
> more. Maybe sometimes I am too demanding, and this was a $2000
> device, so I shouldnt complain much :)

You're not the only one... :) However, my complaint is quite
different - my J6350/1G RAM is unable to run full-view :)
Sessions just drops due to low memory...

Well, based on others experience I can suggest that it's because
I run lots of 'not-so-standard' stuff, like all my iBGP sessions
configured for 'family inet labeled-unicast resolve-vpn', 'family
inet-vpn' and 'family inet6'... And, anyway, full-view is never
considered something I must run on that router.

PS: no problems with traffic. Right now it runs ~700Mbit at 50% idle.
And costs much less than c7301 it replaced :)

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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
On 05/14/08 09:06, Jose Madrid wrote:

<snip?

> about 492K routes, and it averages 72% CPU utilization.

>> show chassis routing-engine
> Routing Engine status:
> DRAM 1024 MB
> Memory utilization 75 percent
> CPU utilization:
> User 8 percent
> Real-time threads 20 percent
> Kernel 72 percent
> Idle 0 percent
>

what version of junos are you running? there is a known bug between
8.5R2 and 9.0R2 that incorrectly shows idle percent as kernel. You are
probably only really running at 28%. :)

http://kb.juniper.net/KB11310

phil
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
You are absolutely correct. Ok, no issues with the J2320 :) This has
made my day, thanks for the info.

> show version
Hostname: PR1.LGA0
Model: j2320
JUNOS Software Release [8.5R2.10]

> show system processes extensive | except 0.00
last pid: 25415; load averages: 0.21, 0.22, 0.18 up 21+16:20:48 10:06:59
92 processes: 3 running, 71 sleeping, 18 waiting

Mem: 242M Active, 83M Inact, 413M Wired, 48M Cache, 69M Buf, 208M Free
Swap:

PID USERNAME THR PRI NICE SIZE RES STATE TIME WCPU COMMAND
11 root 1 171 52 0K 12K RUN 395.8H 80.13% idle




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It has to start somewhere, it has to start sometime. What better place
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
----- Original Message -----
From: Eric Van Tol <eric@atlantech.net>
To: "'Lee Hetherington'"
<lee.hetherington@redtechnology.com>
Cc: "juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net"
<juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net>
Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router
Date: Wed, 14 May 2008 06:23:02 -0400

> I can attest that a J2350 with 1G of RAM can take two full
> tables and run +150Mb/s without a problem. If you're
> looking to save money, don't go with the costly Juniper
> RAM upgrade kit. I'm not sure if vendors think their
> memory is lined with platinum, plated in diamond-encrusted
> gold, and made from the hides of endangered species, but
> the cost of these RAM upgrades is insane. You can get a
> 1G memory stick from Crucial that will work for about $60
> as opposed to the $2K or more you would spend on the
> special kit from Juniper.

In the case of Crucial, it's probably made on the same
manufacturing line, too.
I don't know if this matters to anyone, but most of the J
series can be redeployed as firewalls, too, with a bit of
license work (money, time, and a bit of divine
intervention).

Peter E. Fry

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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
Hi there,

A few performance evaluation papers on the J-Series are available from Iometrix:

http://www.iometrix.com/site/pdfs/CA-Iometrix-Juniper-J4350.pdf
http://www.iometrix.com/site/pdfs/CA-Iometrix-Juniper-J6350.pdf

In general it is as important to be as aware of performance limitations
in packets/sec as bandwidth, and especially so with any centralised CPU-based
forwarding platform as the same CPU is handling both forwarding and control
plane functions. The Iometrix papers have a note at the end on "IMIX and
Stateful Traffic" that explains the packet size distribution used in their
testing methodology that will be helpful in determining the real load that these
routers can handle in a production environment.

A few things to be aware of with the J-Series that are not necessarily
clear from the spec sheets:

- Juniper doesn't recommend exceeding 40 BGP peers on the J2320, but in real
life it all depends on the number of routes/peer and how much you're willing to
let control plane processes use the CPU instead of forwarding packets with it.
Several folks here seem to be running double that number without incident. YMMV.

- With a gig of RAM, these things are supposed to be good to 700K FIB routes
and a million in the RIB. I haven't tested a box with more than two full views
on it, but I think it's safe to say that for the purposes you describe you're OK
memory-wise for a good long while, esp. w/J4350 & 2 gigs. It's worth pointing
out that unlike an M/T/MX routing engine there's no hard drive, so if you run
out of physical memory there's no swapping, only pain.

- There are EPIM (PCI Express) slots on the J4350 (2) and J6350 (4) that allow
for approx. 7x the bandwidth of the normal expansion slots. When using a UPIM
card (the new multi-GigE cards) in one of these slots I think it's safe to say
that as traffic increases, the packet forwarding will kill the CPU before the
bus runs out of bandwidth. These slots are a good argument for springing for
one of the beefier routers, and the presence of only 2 of them in the J4350 is a
good argument for choosing the 16 port GigE card from the beginning if you need
copper ports.

- As of JunOS 8.5 there exists a version of JunOS called "JunOS ES" (enhanced
services), which begins the integration of JunOS with ScreenOS (you'll notice
that the many J-series and SSG products are identical). This is useful if you
indend to use the box as a stateful firewall or an application accelerator, but
if you're primarily looking for a router, stick to normal JunOS. JunOS ES has a
stateful mode & a packet-based mode, and both are a compromise WRT which
features are available. Obviously the state tables use memory in stateful mode
as well, leaving less room for routing.

- A good part of the reason for the box's performance WRT certain other
expensive blue CPU-based platforms is the scheduling & interrupt handling, which
seems to have been extensively reworked for the J-Series. The "downside" of
this is that ICMP (ping & co.) will never get priority on the CPU, so if you're
monitoring devices with ping & traceroute you should be prepared to not take the
information you get back too seriously.

Best of luck.

-Blake

---
Blake Willis
Network Engineering Consultant
blake at 2112 dot net

"Education enabling individuals to overcome their reluctance or inability to
take full advantage of technological advances and product innovation can be a
means of increasing economic opportunity."

--Alan Greenspan
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
"Peter E. Fry" <pfry-lists@redsword.com> writes:

> I don't know if this matters to anyone, but most of the J
> series can be redeployed as firewalls, too, with a bit of
> license work (money, time, and a bit of divine
> intervention).

How good are they in that capacity? We're considering exactly that,
for hundreds of virtual systems with a low aggregate bandwidth.

Netscreen doesn't let you have all that many virtual systems per box,
and the price is actually higher per virtual system than simply giving
each customer an SSG-5. Of course a rack full of SSG-5's would look a
bit silly, and the cabling wouldn't be much fun...


/Benny


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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
On Thursday 15 May 2008, Blake Willis wrote:

> - Juniper doesn't recommend exceeding 40 BGP peers on
> the J2320, but in real life it all depends on the number
> of routes/peer and how much you're willing to let control
> plane processes use the CPU instead of forwarding packets
> with it. Several folks here seem to be running double
> that number without incident. YMMV.

All inclusive, we have found the J2320 to be cheaper than
Cisco's 7201 router for route reflector applications (even
after purchasing the route reflection licenses, something
I'm not too fond of from Juniper, but hey...).

We are looking to use them, as a start, in smaller PoP's
where we probably have only a handful of full routes and
quite a number of VPN NLRI (L2, L3), and only need to use a
couple RU's of rack space.

I only wish they (officially) supported more than 1GB of
memory.

Cheers,

Mark.
Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
So unofficially more than 1Gb is possible?

Lee

-----Original Message-----
From: juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net
[mailto:juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Mark Tinka
Sent: 16 May 2008 00:45
To: juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net
Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router

On Thursday 15 May 2008, Blake Willis wrote:

> - Juniper doesn't recommend exceeding 40 BGP peers on the J2320, but

> in real life it all depends on the number of routes/peer and how much
> you're willing to let control plane processes use the CPU instead of
> forwarding packets with it. Several folks here seem to be running
> double that number without incident. YMMV.

All inclusive, we have found the J2320 to be cheaper than Cisco's 7201
router for route reflector applications (even after purchasing the route
reflection licenses, something I'm not too fond of from Juniper, but
hey...).

We are looking to use them, as a start, in smaller PoP's where we
probably have only a handful of full routes and quite a number of VPN
NLRI (L2, L3), and only need to use a couple RU's of rack space.

I only wish they (officially) supported more than 1GB of memory.

Cheers,

Mark.
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
On Friday 16 May 2008, Lee Hetherington wrote:

> So unofficially more than 1Gb is possible?

I haven't yet tried :-).

Mark.
Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
MArk,

Now with JUNOS 9.1R1.8 the J-2320, J-2350, J-4350, J-6350 does support 2
GB of RAM each.

Att,


> On Thursday 15 May 2008, Blake Willis wrote:
>
>> - Juniper doesn't recommend exceeding 40 BGP peers on
>> the J2320, but in real life it all depends on the number
>> of routes/peer and how much you're willing to let control
>> plane processes use the CPU instead of forwarding packets
>> with it. Several folks here seem to be running double
>> that number without incident. YMMV.
>
> All inclusive, we have found the J2320 to be cheaper than
> Cisco's 7201 router for route reflector applications (even
> after purchasing the route reflection licenses, something
> I'm not too fond of from Juniper, but hey...).
>
> We are looking to use them, as a start, in smaller PoP's
> where we probably have only a handful of full routes and
> quite a number of VPN NLRI (L2, L3), and only need to use a
> couple RU's of rack space.
>
> I only wish they (officially) supported more than 1GB of
> memory.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Mark.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
Mark,

Now it is official:

http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos91/rn-jseries-91/j-series-compact-flash-and-memory-requirements.html

2 GB for J-2320, J-2350, J-4350 and J-6350.

Att,

Giuliano


> On Friday 16 May 2008, Lee Hetherington wrote:
>
>> So unofficially more than 1Gb is possible?
>
> I haven't yet tried :-).
>
> Mark.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
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>
>
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>
> The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.
>
> http://www.eset.com

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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
----- Original Message -----
From: "GIULIANO (UOL)" <giulianocm@uol.com.br>

> Mark,
>
> Now it is official:
>
>
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos91/rn-jseries-91/j-series-compact-flash-and-memory-requirements.html
>
> 2 GB for J-2320, J-2350, J-4350 and J-6350.

Unofficially the SSG 550 (ScreenOS) supports 2GB; it won't
boot with >2. JunOS doesn't boot at all on my SSG 550
(non-M) chassis, but the FreeBSD portion does, and doesn't
seem to mind >2GB. (The chipset supports 4GB, and ECC.) I
may try a later JunOS, but the CF is buried, so checking is
a pain. It's also my production firewall. Hmm -- I also
redeployed the extra RAM, so I guess I won't be checking
it...

Peter E. Fry

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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
On Friday 16 May 2008, GIULIANO (UOL) wrote:

> Mark,
>
> Now it is official:
>
> http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos91/
>rn-jseries-91/j-series-compact-flash-and-memory-requiremen
>ts.html
>
> 2 GB for J-2320, J-2350, J-4350 and J-6350.

Looks like it became available, first, in JunOS 9.0:

http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos90/rn-jseries-90/j-series-compact-flash-and-memory-requirements.html#rn-cf-mem-reqs

Other documents related to the platform are not yet updated
with the new part numbers, though.

Cheers,

Mark.
Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
So does a j2320 have slot for 2 Gb of ram?

Wonder how much it will cost to replace the ram?

TS

-----Original Message-----
From: juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net
[mailto:juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Mark Tinka
Sent: Saturday, 17 May 2008 1:14 PM
To: giulianocm@uol.com.br
Cc: juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net
Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router

On Friday 16 May 2008, GIULIANO (UOL) wrote:

> Mark,
>
> Now it is official:
>
> http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos91/
>rn-jseries-91/j-series-compact-flash-and-memory-requiremen
>ts.html
>
> 2 GB for J-2320, J-2350, J-4350 and J-6350.

Looks like it became available, first, in JunOS 9.0:

http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos90/rn-jseries-90/j
-series-compact-flash-and-memory-requirements.html#rn-cf-mem-reqs

Other documents related to the platform are not yet updated
with the new part numbers, though.

Cheers,

Mark.
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Re: Which Router [ In reply to ]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RTFM

http://www.quotegarden.com/procrastination.html

apologies, a support contract & a pinch of salt might do the trick.





----- Original Message -----
From: "Travers Stark" <travers@tjsnetworkconsulting.com.au>
To: <juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net>
Sent: Sunday, May 18, 2008 12:36 AM
Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router


> So does a j2320 have slot for 2 Gb of ram?
>
> Wonder how much it will cost to replace the ram?
>
> TS
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net
> [mailto:juniper-nsp-bounces@puck.nether.net] On Behalf Of Mark Tinka
> Sent: Saturday, 17 May 2008 1:14 PM
> To: giulianocm@uol.com.br
> Cc: juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net
> Subject: Re: [j-nsp] Which Router
>
> On Friday 16 May 2008, GIULIANO (UOL) wrote:
>
>> Mark,
>>
>> Now it is official:
>>
>> http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos91/
>>rn-jseries-91/j-series-compact-flash-and-memory-requiremen
>>ts.html
>>
>> 2 GB for J-2320, J-2350, J-4350 and J-6350.
>
> Looks like it became available, first, in JunOS 9.0:
>
> http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/jseries/junos90/rn-jseries-90/j
> -series-compact-flash-and-memory-requirements.html#rn-cf-mem-reqs
>
> Other documents related to the platform are not yet updated
> with the new part numbers, though.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Mark.
> _______________________________________________
> juniper-nsp mailing list juniper-nsp@puck.nether.net
> https://puck.nether.net/mailman/listinfo/juniper-nsp
>

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