Mailing List Archive

CentOS default boot
I've just had what seemed to be an nvidia problem in CentOS 5.5, but it
turned out that the default boot kernel hadn't been updated from 194 to
194.3.1 Since I only had kmdls for the updated kernel installed
everything became rather difficult.

I remember thet long ago I used to disable a newly installed kernel
until I had a full set of kmdls. Now I usually delay installation until
the kmdls are available, and I had thought that the new kernel had then
automatically become the default. Apparently not.

If this isn't just my past coming back to haunt me this note may sound a
useful alarm.

John P


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Re: CentOS default boot [ In reply to ]
John Pilkington wrote:
> I've just had what seemed to be an nvidia problem in CentOS 5.5, but it
> turned out that the default boot kernel hadn't been updated from 194 to
> 194.3.1 Since I only had kmdls for the updated kernel installed
> everything became rather difficult.
>
> I remember thet long ago I used to disable a newly installed kernel
> until I had a full set of kmdls. Now I usually delay installation until
> the kmdls are available, and I had thought that the new kernel had then
> automatically become the default. Apparently not.
>
> If this isn't just my past coming back to haunt me this note may sound a
> useful alarm.

John,
I've upgraded four hosts from 5.4 to 5.5. In every case the 194.3.1 kernel was
installed and made the default kernel.

My routine is in this case (version upgrade), I'll do the upgrade, then
install the kmdls for the new kernel then reboot. For in-version kernel
updates through Yum, I'll let Yum install the new kernel. I'll check if the
new kmdls are available. If they are, I'll install them and reboot into the
new kernel. If they are not available, I'll edit grub.conf to make the old
kernel the default kernel just in case there's a reboot while waiting for the
missing kmdls.

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Re: CentOS default boot [ In reply to ]
On Wed, May 26, 2010 at 7:47 PM, Kirk Bocek <t004@kbocek.com> wrote:

>
> John Pilkington wrote:
>
>> I've just had what seemed to be an nvidia problem in CentOS 5.5, but it
>> turned out that the default boot kernel hadn't been updated from 194 to
>> 194.3.1 Since I only had kmdls for the updated kernel installed everything
>> became rather difficult.
>>
>> I remember thet long ago I used to disable a newly installed kernel until
>> I had a full set of kmdls. Now I usually delay installation until the kmdls
>> are available, and I had thought that the new kernel had then automatically
>> become the default. Apparently not.
>>
>> If this isn't just my past coming back to haunt me this note may sound a
>> useful alarm.
>>
>
> John,
> I've upgraded four hosts from 5.4 to 5.5. In every case the 194.3.1 kernel
> was installed and made the default kernel.
>
>
It depends on what you have in /etc/sysconfig/kernel:

[cascavel:~/SRPMS/atrpms] more /etc/sysconfig/kernel
# UPDATEDEFAULT specifies if new-kernel-pkg should make
# new kernels the default
UPDATEDEFAULT=yes

Also note that if a new nvidia version is installed simultaneously with a
new kernel, the old kernel may not have a corresponding kmdl for the new
nvidia version and x will not start, unless the boot is through the new
kernel.

Another point is that we are using a new symbolic link for the current
nvidia version, and the script nvidia.py should be used to fix previously
installed versions (Fedora and RHEL use the same scheme).

--
Paulo Roma Cavalcanti
LCG - UFRJ